7 Dumb Things from the Latest Satoshi Reveal

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Another person is claiming to be Satoshi Nakamoto, and once again, internet sleuths have been quick to poke holes in the story.

The fun began when a company called Ivy McLemore sent out an email announcing a “big reveal.” Their story? Another Satoshi was about to appear and he was about to post a big reveal on the site Satoshi Nakamoto Renaissance Holdings a mysterious site registered on August 8, 2019.

The first email came on Sunday afternoon:

Thank you for your interest in “My Reveal” and your devotion to the truth. As you read Part I, you will see that I felt the time has come to reveal my identity to fulfill the real vision of Bitcoin.

Then the dumb stuff started. Here’s what you need to know.

1. First, there was no real reveal. This Satoshi wanted to create some drama by drawing out the reveal for the next two days, culminating in ultimate proof. This first post was a teaser, as it were, for better things to come.

2. Did you know that Bitcoin stood for “Bank of Credit and Commerce International?” It’s obvious if you think about it:

What is BCCI? “It all began in my childhood when I heard stories from my father about Agha Hasan Abedi, who founded United Bank Limited (UBL) in 1959. When Pakistan nationalised banking in 1972, Abedi founded the Bank of Credit and Commerce International (BCCI). At one time, BCCI was the world’s seventh-largest bank,” Satoshi wrote. BCCI closed in disgrace but Satoshi wanted to bring it back and therefore decided to torturously created “BITCOIN” to create an encrypted version of BCCI.

In short, this Satoshi wanted to connect himself to older domains that he owned in 2008 – around the time bitcoin began.

3. The name Satoshi Nakamoto itself came about for a very simple reason: ancient occult Chaldean Numerology. In Chaldean Numerology, letters have a strength and a number or something and the name Satoshi has something to do with Mercury. I’ll let Mr. Nakamoto explain:

When deciding on an alias surname, I wanted a master numerological name which had two Mercury numbers (5) associated with it. Mercury is the messenger of God in astrology. The number 55 represents the total and complete man and is symbolized by the two hands – 10 fingers — that join at the moment of prayer. In Chaldean numerology, a person with a 55 name is said to have the power to defeat any enemy he faces.

4. Satoshi is probably a guy named Bilal Khalid. Using the power of a web search, Riccardo Spagni aka FluffyPony found that the domain name theBBCI.com once belonged to Khalid.

5. BCCI has never been used for bitcoin. The most damning evidence is Khalid alleged claim to have used BCCI for blockchain-based businesses. Instead, Spagni found that even in 2014 BCCI stood for Blue Chip Capital International with no mention of bitcoin, in Chaldean code or otherwise.

6. Records for theBCCI.com point to Khalid multiple times

First, an old record of domain registration points directly to Khalid in 2008. This record includes his email, address, and phone number.

Domain Name: THEBCCI.NET
Registrant:
BCCI
Bilal Khalid
Rawalpindi
Punjab,46000
PK
Tel.
Creation Date: 18-Nov-2008
Expiration Date: 18-Nov-2009
Domain servers in listed order:
ns2.hostingmadeeasy.com
ns.hostingmadeeasy.com
Administrative Contact:
BCCI
Bilal Khalid
Rawalpindi
Punjab,46000
PK
Tel.
Technical Contact:
BCCI
Bilal Khalid 
Rawalpindi
Punjab,46000
PK
Tel.
Billing Contact:
BCCI
Bilal Khalid
Rawalpindi
Punjab,46000
PK

Tel.

Further, we have record of a dissolved company, BCCI, owned by Khalid.

These sites are currently dark.

7. Most of the information points to someone hanging out in a hotel in the UK. For example, according to EXIF data a picture of an old laptop used by Satoshi to mine bitcoin was taken with an iPhone X in a Holiday Inn in Manchester. The real Satoshi, we’d assume, would be savvy enough to scrub this data and perhaps just send something signed with his private key and drop the mic instead of running a three day circus.

Is Khalid the new Satoshi? All signs point to “No.” Ivy McLemore declined to comment. An email to Khalid’s address went unanswered.

What are we supposed to think about all this? As Charlie Lee notes, this is probably another fake:

Image via Shutterstock.

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